Harvest of the Month at Office of Health Advancement and Bounty of the Bridgers

Montana Harvest of the Month program showcases Montana grown foods in Montana communities. Each month, the Office of Health Advancement, MSU Culinary Services and Bounty of the Bridgers food Pantry will focus on promoting one locally grown food item.  As a student, you can stop by our office between 9 am – 4 pm Monday – Friday and get about 1 pound of the featured produce item and a recipe card featuring fun facts, information about where the food is grown, and an easy, inexpensive recipe.

For those getting food from Bounty of the Bridgers food pantry you will have an option to get the local produce item when you come pick up your food.

And, if you get food in the dining halls, MSU Culinary Services will also be providing at least one meal, often several, that feature the local produce item all month long!

Get Free Produce! Win Prizes!

Anyone who picks up a Harvest of the Month food item either from our office or from Bounty of the Bridgers will be entered into a drawing for cool prizes like a nutribullet, instant pot, and Town and Country gift cards.

Brassicas

This months featured produce item is brassicas. Brassicas are a diverse vegetable in the mustard family and depending on the variety, we eat different parts of the plant: roots, stems, leaves, flowers, and seeds! Vegetables in the brassicca family include cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli, and rutabaga just to name a few.

Many of the Brassicas that we enjoy as food today either originated in northwest Europe or the Mediterranean but over the past 2,000 years, Brassicas were most likely domesticated in the Mediterranean region. The ancient Greeks recorded medicinal and culinary uses of Brassicas.

Although the Brassica genus is extremely diverse, most Brassicas are excellent sources of vitamin C and good sources of potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin B6. Vitamin A is important because it helps maintain good vision and keeps skin healthy. All Brassicas are rich in phytochemicals, meaning they are antioxidant-dense and have anticarcinogenic and anti-inflammatory properties.

This months brassicas come to us from Gallatin Valley Botanical, located in the Rocky Creek bottomlands of Bozeman.

For an easy dose of brassicas try this ginger cabbage salad and stop by our office for some free cabbage for the recipe!

Looking for more inexpensive ways to use cabbage? Try these recipes!

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